F1 favourites set for 70th-birthday bash at Concours of Elegance

| 18 Aug 2020
Classic & Sports Car - F1 favourites set for 70th-birthday bash at Concours of Elegance

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Roaring into the forthcoming Concours of Elegance will be racing royalty, celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Formula One championship.

One of these will be Damon Hill’s 1993 Williams FW15C, in which he won three Grands Prix, which will be on show at Hampton Court Palace on 4-6 September as well as vying for concours glory.

And of course that year Alain Prost beat Ayrton Senna to the drivers’ title in the sister Williams, the team also sealing the constructors’ crown.

Classic & Sports Car - F1 favourites set for 70th-birthday bash at Concours of Elegance
1961 Lotus 18-21, chassis 916

This 1961 Lotus 18-21, chassis 916, will be on show, too, and it is the car in which Stirling Moss won that year’s South African and Danish Grands Prix.

These will be joined by the V12-powered Ferrari 312/67, chassis 0007, from 1967. This car made its debut at ’67’s Italian Grand Prix, before being updated to the following year’s specification and raced a further six times.

“It is a great thrill for the Concours of Elegance to display some of these incredible machines in such an important year for Formula One,” commented Andrew Evans, Concours of Elegance Managing Director.

“Historic racers presented in such historic surroundings are sure to make unforgettable memories for every fan of the sport.”

The event will also host Gooding & Company’s first auction outside the USA and promises other amazing displays including a Le Mans McLaren showcase. Plus, you and your car club can get involved.

And remember you can get discounted Concours of Elegance tickets, exclusive parking and more with C&SC, click here


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