Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered

| 10 May 2019
Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered

Half a century since it played a memorable role in seminal film The Italian Job, the ‘crashed’ Lamborghini Miura, apparently left as a wreck in an Alpine valley, has been found.

And it turns out it was never actually crashed in the first place – because the production company had two identical orange Miura P400s all along.

Yes, one met a fiery end, before being disposed of by a bulldozer in the film’s opening sequence. But that wasn’t the car driven by actor Rossano Brazzi – rather, it was an already-crashed example, because who’d really want to wipe out two Miuras if they could avoid it, especially when someone had already done the job for them?

Of course, the magic of the movies is such that it took a few years, in that pre-internet age, for this news to surface – and then the hunt was on to find the real Italian Job Miura.

Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered
Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered
Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered
Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered

The Arancio Miura, with a white and black leather interior, is currently in the Kaiser Collection in Vaduz, Liechtenstein.

Fritz Kaiser bought it in 2018 and went to Lamborghini Polo Storico, the marque’s classic department, to establish once and for all if this really was the ‘missing’ car, driven by Brazzi in the film.

Following extensive research of the archives and the car, and through speaking to former employees, it’s been confirmed that this Miura, chassis #3586, is definitely that Miura.

Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered
Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered
Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered
Classic & Sports Car – Original Italian Job Miura rediscovered

Enzo Moruzzi is the man who took the car to the set for the production company, Paramount Pictures.

“There was a Miura P400 almost ready on the production line, in the right colour, left-hand drive and with white leather interior. It was aesthetically identical to the damaged one and we decided to use it for the film,” he recalls. 

“The only thing worrying us was the elegant white leather seats, given that the car had to get back to Sant’Agata in perfect condition. So, I asked for them to be taken out, replacing them with a set of black leather seats that we used for testing.

“The giveaway was the headrests, which on the Miura are attached to the dividing glass between the driver compartment and the engine compartment, which couldn’t be replaced in time. In the film, you can see the original white headrests.”

So there you have it – the secret is out!

 

And if you want to relive that opening sequence once again, don’t miss our brand-new Supercars Greatest Hits special-edition magazine, in which we take a trio of Miuras back to that very spot – but thankfully (spoiler alert) all make it home in one piece.


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